Live In Brazil review by Encore Magazine

This is the new Gary Williams CD which comes hot on the heels of his book Cabaret Secrets (cabaretsecrets.com). Gary has been entertaining audiences both in this country and abroad not to mention on the ocean waves for many years. You may have seen Gary singing songs from the 20th Century songbook including many associated with Frank Sinatra but this CD offers much more... It is evident from the opening medley of The Coffee Song & Brazil that Gary does indeed have a musical affinity with Brazil. This wonderful "live" album was recorded in Febraury 2013 during his headlining season aboard the Splendour of the Seas.

This is indeed the current flavour of Gary Williams singing as he performs many of his favourite Brazilian songs and South America themes plus some surprises and classics of the songbook too. You can hear that the audience are taken along with this theme and the chat is aplenty. The format of the CD is such that the chat segments have their own track numbers allowing for just the musical numbers to be be played if that is your wish.

Gary comes across as enthusiastic and reactive throughout this 62 minute, 22 track, master class in entertaining an audience. It is always difficult to transfer a "live" performance to an album as the contact between performer and audience is so much a part of the success of the show. This album brings with it all the atmosphere of a modern cabaret/stage show. Gary is in fine voice throughout and is backed by a really lively orchestra led by musical director & pianist/keyboards Jack Borkofski.

The modern day medley selections include a Gipsy Kings medley; a Lady Gaga swing medley and the Kylie Minogue shuffle. All time favourites include My Way; L.O.V.E.; When I Fall in Love & What a Wonderful World. These along with the Brazilian themed songs and plenty of other familiar songs make for a special musical journey.

The CD is available from Jazz CDs (www.jazzcds.co.uk); Dress Circle (www.dresscircle.com) and will soon be out to download from the usual places.

Clive Fuller Encore Magazine